Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Tamanegi-Kobo Honey Dress

I finally succumbed to the lure of Japanese PDF patterns. And you know what - I'm glad I did!


I had heard of Tamanegi-kobo patterns before, mostly from browsing the internet, but it wasn't until the very kind Waka (gosh, I love the IG community!) suggested I try them that I dared to visit the website to take a look at some of the patterns. Thanks, Wakako!!



I chose from the Toddler category (90/100cm-130/140cm), though my daughter is hardly what I consider a "toddler" anymore, haha. Note: be sure to scroll down to the sizing to check the range, because I have noticed that it varies from pattern to pattern. For example, the Quiche dress runs 90cm-120cm while the Honey dress, which I made, runs 100cm-130cm. There are also patterns for Juniors (up to 160cm) and one pattern for Babies (70-90cm). I have yet to try any of the adult patterns. I think it's kind of fun that all the patterns seem to be named for food/drink.

The Honey dress doesn't have a huge size range, but considering I would probably make a couple in each size, as my younger daughter is around 110cm and my older daughter wears 120cm, I figured the price wasn't too unreasonable at 900yen. 
Especially since I could also use the pattern to make a few shirts, too. The same pattern for juniors is called the Ginger Ale (500yen) and has three sizes: 140-160cm. I probably should have tried a free pattern (like these leggings) first to see if I would like it, but going on word-of-mouth and judging from how many people seem to have used the patterns and like them, I crossed my fingers and hoped that it would all work out. And for the most part, I think it did. This was my first attempt in the 120cm:



I used some of my lovely Nosh Fabric - Jersey in Nude Rose (which I was originally saving for myself, but when I saw this pattern, I thought it would be perfect for it). I definitely wanted black for the bow, and it wasn't until I had nearly finished the dress that I realized I probably had this "Ashes of Roses" dress from the TV mini-series "The Thorn Birds" in mind - at least on some level. Not that I am condoning an illicit romance with between a priest and a young lady, not at all. Does anyone remember it? I remember being so impressed with Barbara Stanwyck and Jean Simmons (no, not that Gene Simmons)! Did I just age myself? Haha! 



I love the sleeves and the pleating (but I don't love how the neckline is serged and folded over), and I thought with the right fabric I wouldn't even need the bow (which has grown on me since the first time I made the dress - though I think the stretch sweatshirting fabric I used in this version was too heavy). I had a bit of drama with my husband, who could not appreciate the design of the dress, as I mentioned in my IG post HERE, haha. Thank you all for your helpful comments, and by the way, I have since moved the center of the bow up on the bodice, for those of you who are wondering. 

I knew that the KUISKE in maple sugar would look very pretty for this dress, or any dress for that matter. I ordered it figuring I could make myself a nice summery top. Well, that didn't happen. Why I keep using all this beautiful fabric for my children instead of myself I couldn't tell you! I would say that the fabric was calling me, but then I would sound like the village crazy lady, so I'll refrain.



But look at that fabric! Isn't it beautiful? I was a bit worried it might seem a bit too grown up for my daughter, but she loved the "feathers." 



At this point, you're probably wondering about the pattern itself, so here's a brief overview. There are two sleeves: short, flared sleeve and a long sleeve, both of which I love because they are so soft and feminine-looking. The pattern includes a finished garment size chart, recommended fabrics, a fabric usage chart, notions, and a taping chart (in the pattern). The pattern pieces include the seam allowance as well as some tips for those using a serger, which went over my head as I haven't got one - yet. And yes, there are notches. The illustrations are clear and easy to follow, and it is an easy pattern, rated 2 stars out of 5 for difficulty. Oh, and yes, it's in Japanese (though you can navigate the site in English - and I think this means the patterns are available in English, too, yay!).



I can't say enough about the Nosh fabrics* I used for both dresses. They are gorgeous, easy to work with, and a dream to wear. I love this dress with the ribbing for the neckline, and I will probably make a few more over the next couple of years. Next couple of years? Who am I kidding - more like next couple of months - I'm always checking to see what's new on the Nosh website, haha.

Thanks for reading and happy sewing!

*This post was created in collaboration with Nosh, but all opinions of the fabric (and the pattern) are of course my own. 

16 comments:

  1. These dresses are so beautiful! 💕

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    1. Thank you so much, Sofie! I really enjoyed making them :)

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  2. This dress is adorable! The sleeves are so beautiful. ��

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    1. Thank you, Maria! I love the sleeves so much, too.

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  3. What great patterns for the artsy Nosh ❤️

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    1. Thanks, Bettina! It was pretty much a no-brainer! ;)

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  4. Ah yes, so so so pretty! That fabric is really so perfect for this dress design. I absolutely love it.

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    1. Thank you, Mie! When I found this pattern, I pretty much knew this fabric had to go to my daughter, haha.

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  5. The flared sleeves are so pretty! Love that 'feather' fabric too :)

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    1. Thank you, Marisa! I kind of want a grown-up version for myself now...

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  6. Such pretty dresses, Emmi! The fabric is perfect!

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    1. Thanks, Olga! I really love the fabrics - and judging from how often my daughter has been wearing both dresses, she does too! <3

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  7. Beautiful fabric and colour choices for this dress

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    1. Thank you, Thao! I guess I do have a soft spot for pinks, so I was really happy when my big girl (who usually likes blue) didn't object. Must be the lure of these magical fabrics! ;)

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  8. I looooove the bow version! The black combines so well with the nude pink!

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    1. Thank you so much, Eva! I was really hoping when I chose the two colors that they would work well together - I'm so happy you like it!

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